Welcome to Life Images by Jill

Welcome to Life Images by Jill.........Stepping into the light and bringing together the images and stories of our world.
I am a photographer, writer and multi-media artist. Through my blog I am
seeking to preserve images and memories of the beautiful world in which we live and the people in it.

Welcome!

Welcome!
PLEASE CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO GO TO MY RED BUBBLE STORE.

Monday, 14 June 2021

Monochrome photography - give it a go!

 Hi everyone, I hope you are all doing well. It is freezing here today. A good day to be inside in front of the fire. Or even playing around with your photography. 

Yes on a wet cold day you can still do photography. What about taking a photo of that bowl of soup you have just made for dinner? Or just lay out some kitchen utensils. Experiment with something new. 

Have you tried monochrome photography - black and white OR tones of one colour? (ie you could change an image to tones of green) 

A couple of weeks ago our photography group had a zoom workshop with an eminent mono photographer. I was blown away by his images and learnt a lot. Len's work is so inspiring. 

Thank you Len Metcalf  


Len says he leaves his camera in black and white mode while he takes his photos, whereas "I thought" the "usual" school of thought was to take your photos in colour, then convert potentials to black and white later in post processing. Of course before the advent of digital photography we had to choose whether to use a colour roll or black and white.

I won't pretend to be anywhere near the level of Len or any of the other great black and white photographers, but here are a few pics maybe to get you thinking about monochrome - which is very much, I think, about shapes, texture, form, contrast, shades and light. Monochrome takes away the distractions of colour and allows us to hone in on the subject matter. 

Not all subjects photograph well in black and white. So experiment! 

Here are some tips from Digital Photography School: Beginners guide to black & white photography

Lets start in the kitchen. They usually don't recommend mono for food, as the colour in food photography is compensating for the viewer for the lack of taste and smell, but I think these few work... In case you are wondering, top left is liquorice allsorts minus the colour! 


In the garden or out walking. That is a seed head top left, and close up of a banksia flower bottom left. Don't forget you can also take photos against (facing toward) the light as in bottom right. 


or these....  Incidentally the top left photo is processed with tones of one colour


Architecture is a great subject for mono photography. Take a walk in any town or city and you will find shapes, angles, patterns everywhere. Look for shadows and look up and down. Reflections in windows are great subjects too. 



If you have Lightroom you can change to TONES of your image to tones of ONE COLOUR. Make a copy of your image, and then in the DEVELOP tab, change your image to black and white, then look for the split toning tab on the right hand side of the develop screen, and move the sliders so the HUE and the SATURATION are the same number. You can see below I have changed this image of the window reflection to blue - and therefore monochrome. 



I had a thing about photographing balconies and washing when we were walking in Spain and Italy a couple of years ago. Recently I read that when sky can be blown out because you are trying to compensate for the shadow in the narrow street - converting to black and white can make this less noticeable. I think it works in this photo. 


Black and white portraits are classic and timeless 


And a few more. Even fireworks - bottom right below


Monochrome - tones of one colour


Thank you so much for stopping by. I hope you have enjoyed this little look at mono photography. Do you enjoy mono photography?

To find out more: there are of course many many more......

I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week. 
I am linking up to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!
   
MosaicMonday at Letting Go of the Bay Leaf
Sharon's Sovenirs 

Our World Tuesday
Pictorial Tuesday 
ThroughMy Lens 
Image-in-ing
My corner of the world through my camera 
Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global hosted by Randomosity. 
       and Little bird - Pienilintu
Thankful Thursday 
Der-Natur-Thursday 
The Lovin' Life Team over at: Deep Fried Fruit
 Month end link up @ Live love craft me

Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.

Tuesday, 8 June 2021

Celebrating Western Australia Day

Today, Monday 7 June is WA Day in Western Australia. It is the day set aside for Western Australians to celebrate all that makes Western Australia a wonderful place to live and the diversity of our people and cultures, those now, and those in the past who have made Western Australia what it is today. 

And WOW those landscapes!

When I looked back at last year's post: Celebrating WA Day - Wander out Yonder in Western Australia - we were in the midst of the first months of the Covid crisis, and Western Australia's internal borders with the other states in Australia and internationally were closed. Our cases remain low here in Australlia, due to our strict quarantine regulations with people entering Australia from overseas. Unfortunately in the last two weeks there has been a rise in cases in one of our eastern states, Victoria, but thankfully WA remains a relatively safe place to live and a great place to travel. 

Western Australians are exploring our state more than ever before. Accommodation is booked out months ahead and caravan sales are on the rise. Those who usually holiday overseas are discovering the amazing diversity of our own State. 

Here's a look at our map and a couple of fast facts:

  • Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,527,013 square kilometres (975,685 square miles)
  • Western Australia occupies the western 32.9% of the land area of Australia
  • Perth (WA’s capital) is the most isolated city in the world, with its closest city being Adelaide and that’s over 2,200 km (1367 miles) away.
  • Western Australia boasts approximately 10,194 kilometres (6,334 miles) of coastline. No wonder water sports are so popular. 
  • Our capital city Perth is closer to Bali than to our National capital, Canberra. 

Australia is the world's sixth largest country after Russia, Canada, China, the USA, and Brazil and the world's largest island. 
Don't believe Australia or Western Australia could be this big? Look at this comparison over a map of the USA. The red line down the middle of the map is my poorly drawn approximation of the WA border. 


So Western Australia is a BIG state. 

In last years post: Celebrating WA Day - Wander out Yonder in Western Australia - I took you on an A-Z mini tour of our state. Western Australia is very diverse - from outback deserts, mountains, rocky gorges, forests, coastline, coral reefs, grain fields, remote tracks and walking trails, minerals, history, art, unique wildflowers and wildlife. I could go on and on. 

I've written about Western Australia many times. You can check out posts under Western Australian travel in my Index. You can also click on the links in this post to read more on my blog about these places. There are also links to official tourism sites for more information. 

In July and August 2016 we did a 42 day 9,331 kilometre road-trip up to the Kimberley in the far north of our state. You can read about it here: On The Road Through the Kimberley

The Kimberley is an area of 423,517 square kilometres (163,521 sq miles), which is about three times the size of England, or just slightly smaller than California.

One photo cannot possibly encompass this huge area, but here is the iconic tree of the Kimberley - the Boab.


And one of it's most celebrated parks - Purnululu National Park



Continuing on down the Western Australian map from north to south, the Pilbara covers 507,896 square kilometres (196099.742 square miles) 

One of the spectacular regions of the Pilbara is Karijini National Park. I took you to the magnificent gorges of Karijini in 2014: Karijini camping Part 1 and Karijini camping part 2


As well as the rugged landscapes of the inland Gascoyne-Murchison region, the Gascoyne is famous for the Ningaloo Reef at Coral Bay and Exmouth, and the wild dolphins at Monkey Mia at Shark Bay. The Gascoyne 137,938 square kilometres (53258.1595 square miles) has more than 600 kilometres of Indian ocean coastline. Life really is a beach in Western Australia. 



Moving on further south to the Midwest we come to the amazing gorges of Kalbarri and explore the historic inland Wool Wagon Pathway 
The Midwest spans around 478,000 square kilometres (184556.832 miles) from the coast to more than 800km inland to Wiluna in the Gibson Desert.


Next we come to our grain growing region, the wheatbelt an area of 154,862 square kilometres (59,793 sq miles) 


A feature of the wheatbelt is the huge granite rocks which are great for free camping and exploring. 


Inland from the wheatbelt is the Goldfields-Esperance region. Located in the south-eastern corner of Western Australia, it is the largest region in the state with a land area of 771,276 square kilometres (297791.328 square miles) extending from the outback to the southern coast. 

This is a fascinating area centred around the history of gold rush in the late 1800s and how they managed the need for water


And then south to the towering forests and wine regions of the cape to cape South West corner covering 23,970 square kilometres (9254.8687 square miles). 



Finally the Great Southernan area of 39,007 square kilometres (15,061 square miles). This is where the forests meet the Southern Ocean, next stop Antarctica.  Things to do in the Great Southern.



And the towering Stirling Ranges National Park. You might remember I shared the amazing array of
wild orchids we saw last year. 


Of course there has to be wildflowers...... There are more than 12,000 species in Western Australia. 


Want to visit? or want more information? Here is a good place to start:
 

And: Tour Downunder Western Australia at Life Images by Jill

Thank you so much for stopping by. I hope you have enjoyed my quick trip through Western Australia. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week. 

I am linking up to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!
   

All Seasons
MosaicMonday at Letting Go of the Bay Leaf
Sharon's Sovenirs 
Our World Tuesday
Pictorial Tuesday 
ThroughMy Lens 
Image-in-ing
My corner of the world through my camera 
Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global hosted by Randomosity. 
       and Little bird - Pienilintu
Thankful Thursday 
Der-Natur-Thursday 
The Lovin' Life Team over at: Deep Fried Fruit
 Month end link up @ Live love craft me
Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.

Monday, 24 May 2021

The amazing bioluminescent green Ghost Fungi

 Hi everyone. I hope you and yours are safe and well. It is late autumn here and the last few days have been wet and cold, so winter is on its way. 

Have you heard of the ghost fungi? I have photographed it before, but didn't know it's name and its unique characteristics until a couple of weeks ago. 

In fact it wasn't until I won the Dardanup Art Spectacular photography prize with this photo, you can see below, of a fungi that I took last year, that a fellow photographer told me it was a ghost fungi.  My original photo is on the left, and my adjusted, winning, photo is on the right. 


A large fungi, growing in overlapping clusters, they are found in southern Australia, and in our area grow around the base or on the trunks of Australian native peppermint trees (
Agonis flexuosa), the fungi — omphalotus nidiformis — are bioluminescent, meaning they emit light.  from: Abc.net.au

Western Australian Aboriginal people referred to the ghost fungus as Chinga, meaning spirit. From: The Conversation.com

24-7 they glow a soft white light which you can see at night, but during the day you can't see this. It is at night when you use a slow shutter speed on your camera that you can capture the luminescent green light they emit. Truly amazing. These fungi were at my son's small acreage. 

How to capture this? You will have to go out at night, need a tripod or solid base to sit your camera and a remote shutter release cable. As these fungi typically grow close to the ground (though I have seen them in trees too), in order to see the underside I laid my camera on the ground. In fact I laid on the ground too. 

You will need to use manual settings and a slow shutter speed. 
According to my friend, I needed an exposure of 3 and a half minutes. I couldn't manage that with my camera (I've researched later how to do this). But I did manage to capture the green with a less slow shutter speed.

These are the settings I used: Aperture f6.3, ISO 640, Shutter speed 30 seconds. 
I laid my camera on the ground, shone a torch on the fungi, focussed the camera on the fungi, half pressed the remote shutter button, turned the light off, and then fully depressed the remote shutter button. The remote release is so you don't get camera shake from pressing the shutter button. 

The focus on this one is a bit out. It's tricky. I certainly need more practise. 

If you don't turn off the torch quick enough you will get something like this you see below. There is a bit of trial and error involved!


This one below I think was affected by moonlight filtering through the trees, whereas the first green one I shared was on the dark side of the trees, so much better colour. 


Focus is out, a bit blurry, and I didn't quite turn the torch off quick enough. 


Truly fascinating and worth playing some more another time. I am really looking forward to my next opportunity to photograph these at night. Unfortunately the fungi around here are collapsing and so just about finished for the year. So will make a note for next year. 

Why do they glow? Some scientists have hypothesised that the light attracts insects that spread mushrooms spores, but a 2016 study found this not to be the case with ghost mushrooms.

Ghost mushrooms are both parasitic, feeding off living tree tissue, and saprotrophic, meaning they eat dead things, in this case rotting wood.

Highly toxic, so please DON'T eat! 

Western Australian Peppermint trees where I found my ghost fungi

More information at:

Thank you so much for stopping by. Have you heard of ghost fungi before? 

I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week. 
I am linking up to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!
   

All Seasons
MosaicMonday at Letting Go of the Bay Leaf
Sharon's Sovenirs 
Our World Tuesday
Pictorial Tuesday 
ThroughMy Lens 
Image-in-ing
My corner of the world through my camera 
Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global hosted by Randomosity. 
       and Little bird - Pienilintu
Thankful Thursday 
Der-Natur-Thursday 
The Lovin' Life Team over at: Deep Fried Fruit
 Month end link up @ Live love craft me
Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.