Welcome to Life Images by Jill

Welcome to Life Images by Jill.........Stepping into the light and bringing together the images and stories of our world.
I am a photographer, writer and multi-media artist. Through my blog I am
seeking to preserve images and memories of the beautiful world in which we live and the people in it.

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Tuesday, 9 November 2021

The Candlestick Banksia - it must be November


Hi everyone. I hope you and yours are doing well. 
It must be November because here in Western Australia the Candlestick Banksias are coming into flower. They remind me of giant Christmas candles. Can you see why? 


Banksia attenuata, commonly known as the candlestick banksia, slender banksia or biara to the Noongar people, is a species of plant in the family Proteaceae. Commonly a tree, it reaches 10 m high, but it is often a shrub in drier areas 0.4 to 2 m high.  The candlestick banksia is found across much of the southwest of Western Australia, from north of Kalbarri National Park in the mid west down to Cape Leeuwin on the south west corner and across to Fitzgerald River National Park on the south coast.  wikipedia

These ones you see below here are growing in a small bush block near my house. They always tell me that summer and Christmas is on its way. 


Here is a closer look at some of the stages of the flower.  The brilliant yellow inflorescences (flower spikes) occur from spring into summer and are up 5 cm (2.0 in) wide and up to 25–30 cm (9.8–11.8 in) tall.

The last image is the nut stage. The 'eyes' burst open to release the seeds. 


The first 2 images here are new leaves unfurling. The rest show the stages of the flower. 

The candlestick banksia is pollinated by and provides food for a wide array of animals in summer months. Several species of honeyeater visit the flower spikes, as does the honey possum, which has an important role as a pollinator. 


That's it from me today. I hope you have enjoyed this little look at the Candlestick Banksia. I have blogged about Banksias before - please click here to explore other varieties I have photographed -   Celebration of the Western Australian Banksia

There are over 75 species of Banksia, all but one occurring naturally within Australia. The greatest concentration of species is found in Western Australia.

You can find some notes here at the Western Australian Department of Parks and Wildlife - Dpaw.wa- Banksia notes

Thank you so much for stopping by. Do you have a favourite flower this time of year? Perhaps you would like to tell us about it in your comments. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Stay safe and have a wonderful week. 


Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.

16 comments:

  1. Wow! I've never seen anything like these! Their symmetry and contrast are a treat for the eyes.
    Thanks, Jill, for sharing at https://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2021/11/more-monarchs.html

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  2. What a gorgeous bloom! I must have missed your earlier blog posts, but sure enjoyed this one. Can't believe that Christmas is so close!! Where does the time go these days????

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    1. I totally understand what you say about where does time go! I haven't been over to your blog lately either. I will pop over now!

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  3. Am almost certain I have never seen these candlesticks blooming in the tree - beautiful Jill!
    Happy to see you at Tue Scribbles:)

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  4. It's always an adventure and surely a great pleasure too, to read about the nature in your wonderful Region of Australia. Never seen before this plants, I'm each time surprised. What a fantastisc nature... thank you for sharing.

    Yes... we are fine. Thank you for asking. But the next wave of Pandemie knock on our doors. Let us hope for better time.

    Stay healthy and well, dear blogfriend 🤗

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    1. I am so happy to hear you are enjoying our amazing wildflowers.

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  5. Looks like corn cobs in a tree. So unusual and unique. Love seeing the variety of plants there.

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    1. yes they do look like corn cobs! I had never considered it before! :)

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  6. You always share the best bits. They do look like Christmas candles on the trees. Enjoy the rest of the week.

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  7. Oh wow; what an interesting plant!!

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  8. Absolutely beautiful photos Jill, as always! You are such an expert on Western Australian flora, and although I don't always get to read all your posts, they are such a delight when I do - and I always learn something!

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    1. Thanks Jo! We really are so fortunate to live in such a beautiful corner of Australia!

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  9. Jill - fabulous photos. I can certainly see why they are called candlesticks! I also think it's interesting how the leaves unfurl, and that "eyes" develop for the seeds. For the seeds, I would have expected it to be more like a pine cone! Thanks for linking to Mosaic Monday!

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  10. Gorgeous blooms! The symmetry and design is so perfect.

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  11. I know I've seen these before but I'm not sure where. Love the stages photos of the leaves unfurling!

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  12. Always wonderful things to see in your area.

    Thanks for sharing your link at My Corner of the World this week!

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I hope you have enjoyed your visit to my blog. Thank you for stopping by and for taking the time to comment. I read and very much appreciate every comment and love hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return.