Welcome to Life Images by Jill

Welcome to Life Images by Jill.........Stepping into the light and bringing together the images and stories of our world.
Through my blog I am
seeking to preserve images and memories of the beautiful world in which we live and the people in it. And in many ways it is my journal of everyday life. If you click on the Index you can see my posts under various topic headings.
I am a Freelance Journalist and Photographer based in Bunbury, Western Australia. My published work specialises in Western Australian travel articles and stories about inspiring everyday people. My passion is photography, writing, travel, wildflower and food photography.
Most recently I have been enjoying exploring other art genres, including Eco-printing with Australian leaves onto cloth and paper.
I hope you enjoy scrolling through my blog. To visit other pages, please click on the tabs above, or go to my Blog Archive on the side bar. Please feel free to leave a comment at the bottom of any of my posts. I value your messages and look forward to hearing from you.If you like my work, and would like to buy a print, or commission me for some work, please go to my "contact me" tab.
Thank you for visiting my blog and helping me "step into the light".

Welcome!

Welcome!
PLEASE CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO GO TO MY RED BUBBLE STORE.

Monday, 5 August 2019

The Boab

The Boab - Adansonia gregorii - icon of the Kimberley, Western Australia 



See more at: The Boab Tree - blog from 2016




Thank you so much for stopping by. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week. 

I am linking up to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.

Monday, 29 July 2019

How Far Does the Hand Reach - world wide eco printing collaboration

I have been experimenting with eco-dyeing for a couple of years and I have blogged about it a couple of times before here - Eco-dyeing - the magical absorbing art



but it has been my absolute privilege to recently be involved in a global eco-dyeing project - How Far Does the Hand Reach - which has been exhibited in  Norwich, England recentlhy as part of a bigger exhibition, Botanical Signatures, by Maria Clarke-Wilson. 

103 eco-dyers from 28 countries around the world contributed silk squares eco-dyed with their local plants, and these were sewn together by Maria according to their location in the world into this huge piece you can see in the pictures below. 



Here is my square printed with Marri tree leaves from a little bush block near my home, with some marri bark ink extra colouring, and outline stitching with silk thread. 



Mine is second from the left in the second row in this picture, along with other pieces from Australia. 



What an amazing project to be involved with. Thank you Maria for bringing us together. I would have loved to have been able to visit the exhibition. 
You can see more at My Botanical Being on Facebook. 


We were invited to contribute two pieces, one on silk and one on cotton, that Maria mailed to us. We could also contribute a third piece, which I did by printing local leaves on paper folded into a concertina shape. 




Thank you so much for stopping by. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week. 


I am linking up to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.


Sunday, 21 July 2019

Anniversary of Man Walking on the Moon

On 16th July 1969 Apollo 11 was launched from the Kennedy Space Centre in Florida, USA. 20th July marks the 50th anniversary of man walking on the moon after landing in the Lunar Module Eagle on the Sea of Tranquility. Commander Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, followed by Buzz Aldrin. They spent about 21 hours on the moon, whilst Michael Collins flew the command module Columnbia above. 

Armstrong''s famous words "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" was heard around the world, as millions watched the scenes unfold on their televisions. 



Were you alive when this event happened? Do you remember it? Did you watch it on TV?
 I was in high-school in 1969 and our science lab was the only classroom with a TV. I remember that the television ran the whole day at school and we were allowed to go in and watch. Mostly it was a lot of scenes of Neil and Buzz bouncing around on the moon, but it was still fascinating, and indeed a great leap forward in space exploration and a significant event in world history. 

And a couple of my own moon photos.... taken during a total lunar eclipse on 31 January 2018.



There is lots on the net about the moon landing:
Wikipedia
Space.com
Earthsky.org


Only a short post from me today, but I thank you so much for stopping by. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week. 


I am linking up to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.

Monday, 8 July 2019

The girl in the train window

Seen on a train this last weekend.  The girl in the train window.....who is she I wonder? What is she looking at? Why does she have that pensive look? Where is she going?



 From a Railway Carriage - by Robert Louis Stevenson 
(from A Child's Garden of Verses 1885)

Faster than fairies, faster than witches,
Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches;
And charging along like troops in a battle,
All through the meadows the horses and cattle:
All of the sights of the hill and the plain
Fly as thick as driving rain;
And ever again, in the wink of an eye,
Painted stations whistle by.


Here is a child who clambers and scrambles,
All by himself and gathering brambles;
Here is a tramp who stands and gazes;
And there is the green for stringing the daisies!
Here is a cart run away in the road
Lumping along with man and load;
And here is a mill and there is a river:
Each a glimpse and gone for ever!

Thank you so much for stopping by. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week.

I am linking up to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.

Sunday, 30 June 2019

Menzies Town Hall without a clock, Western Australia

Whenever we travel we always pick up curious little stories about towns, people, places. They add interest to the history and fabric of the places.

This one - the town hall without a clock - we discovered in the town of Menzies, 130km north of Kalgoorlie in the Western Australian goldfields, when we travelled through Menzies last September on a circuit tour to Cue, once the centre of the Murchison goldfields. I blogged about it here - Cue, Queen of the Murchison

 There are many of these little towns scattered throughout the goldfields regions, which were once booming towns in their heyday of gold discovery. Some of them are now abandoned with only a few scattered bricks remaining.



In 1898 a town hall was built in the booming gold town of Menzies, in the Western Australian goldfields, however for many years the clock tower didn’t have a clock. This caused confusion between the residents as there was telegraph time, set many kilometres away, and mine whistle time, which was always twenty minutes earlier than telegraph time. 

 
Finally in 1904 the Town Clerk was instructed to purchase a clock which was shipped from London on the steamer SS Orizaba. However in February 1905 the Orizaba ran aground off the port of Fremantle due to poor visibility caused by heavy smoke haze over the ocean from a month of bush fires along the coast. 




Within hours there was twenty feet of water in the engine room and the captain sent word to Fremantle via an Italian fisherman. By 7pm three tugs and three barges were alongside and started salvaging the cargo. The passengers, their belongings, and the mail were transferred to Fremantle. 


Six days later the captain and crew left the ship when it started breaking up. About 900 tonnes of cargo was recovered from the ship and several months later winter storms sent the rest of her to the bottom of the ocean. 


 The fate of the Menzies town hall clock is not known – whether it sunk with the ship, or was salvaged and sold – but the clock never reached Menzies. Nearly one hundred years later Menzies was still without a clock. 


In 1999 the Shire of Menzies allocated $16,000 for the purchase of four clocks, designed and built by Perth clockmaker, Derek Morrison, to fit the four faces of the town hall tower. The clocks were unveiled on New Year’s Eve 1999. 




In a final twist to history, recent research indicates that the original clock may not have been ordered as there is no record of the order or that it was on the Orizaba.  One theory is that the Attorney General used the ship sinking as an excuse not to pay for a clock for a town whose population was declining.  Or was there a Menzies clerk feeling relieved that his oversight was never discovered? 



 Menzies is a lovely little town to visit and explore some of the local historical gold-rush history if you are in the goldfields. They have a very neat caravan park in the centre of town. 

Gold was discovered in Menzies in 1894.  The population of 10,000 peaked in 1905 and the town boasted 13 hotels, 3 breweries and 3 banks. By 1910 the population had fallen to less than 1,000, due to the decline in gold production and further hastened by World War 1.  Population today is less than 200.

My article, which you have just read, was published in the November-December 2018 issue of On The Road Magazine. 


Recently I discovered that the Orizaba was indeed ill-fated. In 1889 there was a smallpox outbreak on board and the ship was quarantined in Melbourne. Late in 1889 it collided with the Clan Mackay en route from India. In early April 1903 a crew member was found to have the the plague and he was off-loaded in Egypt, but the ship was treated as an "infected ship" by health authorities when it reached Plymonth. In 1904 an explosion in the engine room killed six crew members. 
From "The Way We Were", Western Australian newspaper, 1 December 2018.  


Thank you so much for stopping by. I hope you have enjoyed this little story about the Menzies clock. Travel can be so fascinating! To find out more about Menzies click here - Menzies

I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week. 

I am linking up to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.