Welcome to Life Images by Jill

LIFE IMAGES BY JILL............."Stepping into the light" and bringing together the stories and images of our world........
Through my writing and photography I seek to preserve images and memories of the beautiful world in which we live and the people in it.

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Welcome to Life Images by Jill.........
I am a Freelance Journalist and Photographer based in Bunbury, Western Australia. My published work specialises in Western Australian travel articles and stories about inspiring everyday people. I have a day job, but my passion is photography, writing, travel, wildflower and food photography. For now my day job supports me until I can pursue my passions full time.
I am a member of South Side Quills in Bunbury, the Fellowship of Australian Writers Western Australia, Photography Group of Bunbury and the Western Australian Photographic Federation.

I hope you enjoy scrolling through my blog. To visit other pages, please click on the tabs above, or go to my Blog Archive on the side bar. Please feel free to leave a comment at the bottom of any of my posts. I value your messages and look forward to hearing from you.

If you like my work, and would like to buy a print, or commission me for some work, please go to my "contact me" tab. Thank you for visiting my blog and helping me "step into the light".

Welcome!

Welcome!

Monday, 18 August 2014

Blooming Art 2014 - Bunbury Regional Art Gallery, Western Australia

I was thrilled recently to be invited to be a Blooming Art Special Guest exhibitor at the floral art exhibition run annually by the Flower Designers Club of Bunbury in the beautiful Chapel Gallery at the Bunbury Regional Art Gallery.   I was invited by Blooming Art Coordinator, Eileen Wenn, who is a friend of mine from Spanish dance class, and who is also a world class floral art designer.

Special invited guest exhibitors select a painting from the City of Bunbury Art Collection, and then represent it through a floral display.  I have no floral art background or formal arts training, so felt very priviledged to be invited, as well as a little apprehensive and excited. 


The painting I chose which you can see below, is a painting by Alisa Small, called Up The Gorge to Tallering Peak.  I was attracted to this painting because we had just past through this area on our way south from the Pilbara.  I love the rich colours, textures and ruggedness of this ancient landscape and how the colours change with the light. Alisa has captured with her painting what I try to capture with my camera. 
You can see Alisa's painting and my interpretation below.


Eileen assisted me initially to choose some flowers, suggesting that the beautiful Scarlet Banksia, Banksia coccinea, which grows in woodland and heathlands through Cranbrook, Denmark, Albany and Esperance would be perfect, due to its red colouring, even though it is not a Pilbara flower. 

 I have seen the Scarlet Banksia in the wild, down around Hopetoun and the Fitzgerald River National Park on Western Australia's south coast. It really is a stunning plant and flower, growing 1 to 8 metres tall.  Here is a photo I took of it during our trip a couple of years ago. My daughter-in-law had a wildflower wedding bouquet including the Scarlet Banksia. 


 I also purchased some Protea. Although a South African native plant, they are grown quite commonly through our area, and are related to Australian banksias, grevilleas and waratahs. 
My friend Eileen, has just told me - What you used in your design is leucadendrons from the protea family. Leucs are the protea that have the nut in middle.
Thanks Eileen


Eileen loaned me a beautiful wooden dish about 60cm across to use as the basis of my piece. I already had a collection of nuts, seeds and rocks, and collected some other leaves, to use in my display, and had a little bit of a play around with the layout the weekend before.

 
Set up time was Wednesday evening, before the opening on Thursday afternoon. 
My thanks to Denise Gillies from Lyndendale Gallery for this pic of me with my completed piece at the opening. I was really pleased with my arrangement and I received some great feedback on my work, not only my friends, but also from professional floral artists. 




The flower you can see upper RH corner below here is the protea - or more correctly leucadendrons.  They last cut for a long time, open up as they mature and are beautiful in the dried state as well.
The stamens of the Scarlet Banksia uncurl as the flower matures. You can see it in closeup below.


I included a box brownie in my display as a connection to my photography.  And I even had some red dirt which was scraped out of the car after our recent return from the Pilbara.


The floral artworks were so creative - below you can see a few. I should have taken more photos. The display lower middle, created from white carnations was created by my friend, artist and also fellow Spanish dancer, Amanda Doust.


I really liked the central display called Violet's Washing Day created by the Flower Designers Club. The little sets of clothes were made from chicken-wire stuffed with dry sea-weed. I loved this little dress.


My Dad is very ill in hospital, and Blooming Art was the bright spot of my week. Afterwards, when the event closed on Sunday afternoon, I boxed up part of my display and took it to my Dad.  

ps - don't throw away those floral gift boxes and paper when you are given flowers - you never know when you might be able to reuse them!


I send my sincere thanks to Eileen Wenn for her support, encouragement and hugs, and the Flower Designers Club of Bunbury for this opportunity. If you go to their Facebook Link here you can see more pics of the wonderful displays from the exhibition  - Flower Designers Club of Bunbury
And some more pics on the ABC website - ABC.net
Thanks for stopping by. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. Have a wonderful week.

I am linking up to Mosaic Monday, Travel Photos Monday, Our World Tuesday, Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global, Travel Photo Thursday, and What's It Wednesday.  Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Mosaic Monday
Travel Photo Mondays
Our World Tuesday
Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global
What's It Wednesday
Travel Photo Thursday

Sunday, 10 August 2014

Pilbara camping - Part 3 - Western Australia

Hi everyone, I hope you have enjoyed my last two posts about camping in Karijini National Park in Western Australia's Pilbara region. If you ever come to Western Australia, and have time, you should visit, particularly if you are here around July-August.
If you missed the posts you can catch up here -  Karijini Camping - Part 1
 and here - Karijini camping - Part 2


Today we are back on the road again, heading out of Karijini and heading towards Mount Augustus - the world's largest monocline.
But first the town of Tom Price - 108km from the Karijini's Dales Gorge campground.
We need to fuel up and buy some fresh supplies for the next leg of our trip, plus a quick email catch up and mail some post cards.

Situated on the edge of the Hamersley Ranges, Tom Price is Western Australia's highest town, 747metres above sea level. Tom Price's economy is dependent on the iron ore industry. The area was only appraised for mining in the early 1960's, so Tom Price is a very young town.  
If you would like to learn more about Tom Price, please click here - Tom Price
Tom Price is located approximately 1600 km from Perth and is situated on the edge of the Hamersley Ranges, within the Shire of Ashburton. It is the highest town in Western Australia at 747m above sea level, hence the name "Top Town" - See more at: http://www.ashburton.wa.gov.au/visit-ashburton/tom-price#sthash.q48NbyJN.dpuf
 You can see an iron ore train and some of the landscape below.



We had been to Tom Price a couple of times before, so didn't stop for long, and were back on the road again late morning, and were now into unknown territory for us. We pulled off the track for a late lunch before turning onto the Ashburton Downs-Meekatharra Road, 231km from Tom Price and 295km to Mt Augustus. 

I think the sign and the pics below say it all - we are a long way from anywhere - 


I think those are the Capricorn Ranges in the distance - on the Tropic of Capricorn.  Desolate it might be......


But it is far from boring..... watch out for stock along the road. There are no fences and you wouldn't want to run into this fellow with the horns. I am amazed at the fortitude of people who come out here to forge a living out of this country.



We thought these rock formations, which looked like pieces of slate stacked on their sides, were really interesting



 This is a 4WD road and conditions can be varied depending on when the grader last came through. There can be corrugations, dips, creek crossings and washaways.  We had been told the road was rough, but we found it to be in fairly good condition, although we stopped and chatted to a group who had a flat tyre.  Make sure your tyres having plenty of tread, and it is wise to carry two spares.  Please drive according to the conditions and take notice of the road signage. We drove around 60-70km/hour.



Around 4pm we started looking for a potential campsite and pulled off the side of the track around 4.15pm and set up camp. Doesn't look like much I know but it was so lovely being out in the bush totally away from anyone. Not one vehicle went past during the night. We made a small fire and toasted marshmallows after dinner. 

We weren't near a watering point, so no stock wandered through during the night.  Something to be aware of if choosing a camping spot in station country.



 I always have my camera....I liked these mud patterns....and the small plant pushing up through the cracks.



Perfect peace and quiet.... we had a wonderful nights sleep. Just the dark sky, the nearly full moon and the stars for company.



We were up early to see the sunrise on the nearby hills...



We wanted to get on the road early so we had breakfast, packed up and left camp around 8am, crossing the Ashburton-Meekatharra shire boundary not long after leaving our camp.



Some kangaroos were out having a hop and a forage....



It was another beautiful blue sky day and we drove through a vast landscape of mountains, creek beds, floodways and winding roads, scrub, spinifex and changing vegetation.  And wildflowers. Can you see the spikes on the one in the bottom RH corner?



We travel with our Hema gps map navigator as well as paper maps, but it is always comforting out here to come to a signpost and know you are on the right track




Only 145km to our destination Mt Augustus. Here is the view from the Yallowerie Hill Lookout...nearly there.....a hot shower and hair washing is calling....



And this is where I will leave you till next time, when we camp at Mt Augustus for a few days and explore this amazing "anticline" rock. 


Thanks for stopping by. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. Have a wonderful week.

I am linking up to Mosaic Monday, Travel Photos Monday, Our World Tuesday, Wednesday Around the World, Travel Photo Thursday, and What's It Wednesday.  Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Mosaic Monday
Travel Photo Mondays
Our World Tuesday
Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global
What's It Wednesday
Travel Photo Thursday


You might also like 
Karijini Camping - Part 1
 - Karijini camping - Part 2
Holland Track, following the path of the prospectors

 
Tom Price is located approximately 1600 km from Perth and is situated on the edge of the Hamersley Ranges, within the Shire of Ashburton. It is the highest town in Western Australia at 747m above sea level, hence the name "Top Town" - See more at: http://www.ashburton.wa.gov.au/visit-ashburton/tom-price#sthash.q48NbyJN.dpuf

Monday, 4 August 2014

Karijini camping - part 2 - Pilbara, Western Australia

Last week I brought you the first part of our recent Pilbara trip, visiting Karijini National Park. If you missed it you can catch up by clicking here - Pilbara camping in Karijini Naitonal Park

Today we travel across the park to Joffre, Knox, Hancock, Weano and Hamersley Gorges and to Mount Bruce. 


The Joffre Falls and the Weano Gorge area is about 30 kilometres west of the Karijini Visitor Centre.  As we had stayed such a long time at Kalamina Gorge (see last week's post), and, I must admit, the fact that I don't feel so confident about clambering down gorge walls these days, we decided for this trip we would just go to the lookouts of the gorges on the western side of the park.  You can't help but be impressed by this awe inspiring landscape. The gorges dramatically show the forces of nature that carved these gorges into the landscape millions of years ago.

First off Joffre Falls and the Knox Gorge lookout. It is only a short walk from the carpark to the lookouts. Joffre Falls lays in a deep natural amphitheatre which would be particularly impressive after rain.  You can just see Joffre Falls on the LHS of the pic below.




From Joffre it is another 14 kms to the Weano Day area where there are picnic facilities.  From here you can climb down into Hancock Gorge and Weano Gorge and explore through to Handrail Pool. Or like us go to the Junction Pool and Oxer Lookouts.  


It always amazes me how trees can grow out of these rock faces. They must find a crack to push their roots down through.

This is inside Weano Gorge - taken during our last trip to Kairjini.
Weano Gorge

 Please note the gorges on the western side of the park are Class 4 and Class 5. The trails can be very difficult and require a high level of fitness, agility and experience. Steep sections with vertical drops are common as are natural hazards including large boulders, water pools, slippery wet rocks and narrow high ledges.  Walkers must get out of the gorges as quickly as possible if it rains, as flash floods can occur. 

Climbing in the gorges can be very hazardous and deaths have occurred - both walkers and those who have gone in to rescue them. This is highlighted by a memorial for a volunteer rescuer near one of the lookouts, and information on the information boards explaining what is involved and how long it takes to get an injured person out of the gorge.

The gorges have very high vertical cliffs and cliff edges can be loose and unstable. Stay on established trails and keep well back from the cliff edges. Please take extra care if you are walking with children. 
Take note of signage, distances, expected walk times, wear appropriate clothing including sturdy walking books (no thongs are not suitable footwear!), sun protection and carry plenty of water and some food. 


To explore the Weano area fully you should stay a few days. There is camping nearby at the Karijini Eco Retreat. 

Another gorge which is more easily assessible is Hamersley Gorge. For this you actually have to exit the park via Karijini Drive and the Hamersley Mt Bruce Road. The gorge is 101km from the Visitor Centre. 

At Hamersley Gorge you can see how the rock has been buckled and folded during its formation millions of years ago. Spectacular. Those are full size trees down the bottom there.


Inspired by Red Nomad's new book "Aussie Loos with Views!" I am always on the lookout for loos to add to Red's collection - I wonder if she has this one at Hamersley Gorge? 
You can check out Red's book and blog here - Red Nomad Oz Amazing Australian Adventures



And this is something I definitely didn't expect to find - a WI-fi connection hot spot! This must be one of the most remote WI-fi connections in Australia. So we decided to have our lunch here and download our emails.  Where is it? - on the road down into Hamersley Gorge.


My travel posts wouldn't be right without a few wildflowers. Lucky for me the wildflower season was just starting when we were there.  The flower on the bottom left hand corner is one of the Mulla Mulla family. This is one of my favorite Pilbara flowers, which lets me know I have arrived in the Pilbara. 


 Below is another one of the Mulla Mulla family, a smaller variety. 


50km from the Visitor Centre via Karijini Drive, you can also climb Mt Bruce, the second-tallest peak in Western Australia. There are 3 walks - 30 minutes return to the Marandoo Mine lookout, 4.6km or 3 hour return along Honey Hakea Track to a vantage point higher up, and the 9km, 6 hour return Mount Bruce summit. If you decide to do this walk, please start early in the morning. It is a Class 5 challenging walk with spectacular views. We were running out of time, so we will need to leave that one till next trip.  But here are a few views along the first part of the trail.

You can see a view of Marandoo mine in the pics below. The Hamersley Ranges area is rich in iron ore, one of Western Australia's biggest export earners. Both tourism and mining are vital to WA's economy, and Marandoo strives to strike a balance between mining and conservation. 


That concludes the second part of our Pilbara trip. I hope you have enjoyed it. Next time we leave Karijini and return to the bitumin briefly before camping out in station country on our way to Mount Augustus. The biggest rock in Australia.


Thanks for stopping by. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. Have a wonderful week.

I am linking up to Mosaic Monday, Travel Photos Monday, Our World Tuesday, Wednesday Around the World, Travel Photo Thursday, and What's It Wednesday.  Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Mosaic Monday
Travel Photo Mondays
Our World Tuesday
Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global
What's It Wednesday
Travel Photo Thursday