Welcome to Life Images by Jill

Welcome to Life Images by Jill.........Stepping into the light and bringing together the images and stories of our world.
Through my blog I am
seeking to preserve images and memories of the beautiful world in which we live and the people in it.
I am a Freelance Journalist and Photographer based in Bunbury, Western Australia. My published work specialises in Western Australian travel articles and stories about inspiring everyday people. My passion is photography, writing, travel, wildflower and food photography.
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Sunday, 5 October 2014

Mount Augustus walk trails, Pilbara, Western Australia

Have you ever been to Mount Augustus in Western Australia’s Pilbara region?  We hadn’t before this last July. I wondered why we had never been there before! If you missed my first blog post about it you can catch up by clicking here – Wildflowers that bloom in the red rock of Mt Augustus

Mount Augustus, or Burringurrah, as it is known by the local Wajarri indigenous people, is the largest rock in the world. 430 kilometres from Carnarvon via Gascoyne Junction or 360 kilometres from Meekatharra, via gravel roads either way, it is easy to explore Mount Augustus from the Mount Augustus Outback Tourist Park, located only a short drive from Mt Augustus National Park. If you stay a few days you can enjoy the numerous walk trails through Mt Augustus.

Please click on "read more" to keeping reading and seeing more!

 
A 49 kilometre circuit drive takes you around the base of Mount Augustus and gives you access to the walks.



Wallk trail maps are available from the Tourist Park, and there are maps and information boards at the start of each walk. Make sure you are aware of the degree of difficulty and the time it will take to do the walks. I recommend starting early in the morning before the day heats up and make sure you wear good walking boots, a hat and sunscreen, and carry plenty of water. Even on a cool day it can become very hot along the walks particularly with radiated heat bouncing off the rocks.



 
 




One of the easier more shaded walks is the Corella Trail (1.2km return) along the banks of Goolinee (Cattle Pool). You are likely to see water birds, corellas and other bird species. It is a pleasant spot for lunch and sunset views of Mt Augustus.
I thought this reflection (bottom left) in a pool along the trail was rather cool.
 
Here are some images of Pilbara birds that my husband took at Goolinee.
I will name some of them - middle top - Pink and Grey Galah, top R - Kestrel, Middle L - Budgerigar(they were nesting in a big tree by the river), Middle R - Corellas, and bottom R - an Aussie chick!
I will try to come back with some more identifications for you.


The Summit Trail (12km return – average 6 hours) should only be undertaken by those who have a high level of fitness. Please make sure you carry plenty of water and food.  The first part of the trail takes you to Beedoboondu (Flintstone Rock) which is a large slab of rock bridging the rocky stream course. If you crawl underneath the rock you can see engravings by ancient Aboriginal people.

Here is a pic of the trail, looking out from under Flintstone Rock, and a tree growing out of a small crack in the rock face. I am always amazed how they manage to do this.


Aboriginal engravings by the Wajarri people can also been see along the 200 metre Mundee trail and at Ooramboo on the Edney’s Peak access track.

We decided to give the Summit Trail a miss and instead did Edney’s Trail (6 km return, 2 to 3 hours) which leads to Edney’s lookout on the south east side of Mt Augustus. Parts of the trail are easy going but it also does include some rock clambering. Look out for the markers to keep you on track. From the lookout you have spectacular elevated views over the surrounding plains. The views were well worth the walk and give you an appreciation of the remoteness of Mount Augustus.

There were numerous wildflowers along the Edney's trail. These Mulla Mulla bushes were covered by lots of moths which flew up as you past by.


If you do the Edney’s Trail first thing in the morning you will still have plenty of time to do another one or two shorter walks in the afternoon.
The Saddle Trail (1km return) takes you past The Pound, a natural basin which was used for holding cattle in the early 1900s prior to droving them “on the hoof” to Meekatharra – a 10 to 12 day walk. At the end of the Saddle Trail you have views over the Lyons River valley.




On the northern side of Mount Augustus there are two walks which are both designated as Class 4 for more experienced walkers. There was certainly more rock scrambling on these walks.

The first part of the Goordgeela lookout trail (3km return – 2 hours) was across an open rocky expanse which was extremely hot on the day that we walked. The walk gets steeper as you go up to the lookout.


The shady Gum Grove Trail has an easy start before joining up with the challenging Kotka Gorge Trail (2km return – 2hours) which takes you up a dry rocky creek bed to the start of the Kotka Gorge. To go beyond this should only be attempted by very experienced bush walkers.


We thoroughly enjoyed our few days at Mount Augustus. On the last night we sat around the campfire with new friends from Busselton, toasted marshmallows (a campfire must) and chatted about past trips. And on the morning we were moving on we saw an amazing sight – the moon setting over Mount Augustus at sunrise. What a stunning end to our visit.



From here we travelled on south to the Kennedy Ranges – check it out next time on my blog. Here is a preview pic -


 
4 Wheel-Drive recommended. No camping, pets or fires allowed in the park. Keep to the tracks and marked trails. Be prepared. Carry plenty of water, wear a hat and good hiking boots on the trails. Bunk accommodation, powered and unpowered caravan and tent sites, fuel and water are available at nearby Mount Augustus Outback Tourist Park. Department of Environment & Conservation volunteers are based here during the winter months.



Thanks for stopping by. I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. Have a wonderful week.

I am linking up to Mosaic Monday, Travel Photos Monday, Our World Tuesday, Wednesday Around the World, Travel Photo Thursday, and What's It Wednesday.  Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world - virtual touring at its best!

Mosaic Monday
Travel Photo Mondays
Our World Tuesday
Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global
What's It Wednesday
Travel Photo Thursday






 



25 comments:

  1. Birds, flowers, gorgeous scenery, the beautiful sunset, so many things to take notice of. You mosaic with reflections, the one in bottom left corner, wow, that one really is very special to me for some reason. I hope that your coming week is filled with great new things to enjoy~

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  2. Delightful scenery on this portion of your trip.
    Thank you for linking to Mosaic Monday.

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  3. Magnificent scenery and photos Jill. I love the one of you in the birdlife collage with a glass of wine in your hand! Lol. Oh yes and those waterholes with the reflections in them were simply stunning.

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  4. Breathtaking scenery Jill. That moon shot is simply amazing. Perfect timing. What an amazing trip. And talk about perfect timing! Beautiful wild flowers ... Frosting on the beautiful scenic cake., lovely post.

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  5. My two favourite photos are the bottom left reflection in the oval pool and those gorgeous birds!

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    1. yes I thought the reflection was rather cool too.

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  6. Our landscapes couldn't be more different but both are beautiful. I have a few Australian friends in the blogging world so am a little familiar with yours, but am unlikely ever to visit in person, so thanks for sharing.

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  7. Good Morning Jill, Well, it is morning in my neck of the woods. What incredible photography . . . I love the reflection shot of the tree by the water and your moon shots. Your landscape looks very similar to ours, but you have way more open space and undisturbed land. Of, course your wildlife and vegetation is totally different. What a beautiful country you love in. I just found you, thanks to Judith at Lavender Cottage . . . she is a sweetie pie. I am your newest follower and looking forward to becoming great blogging friends. Thank you for sharing your amazing talent with us; you certainly have an eye for the camera.
    Connie :)

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    1. I am glad you have enjoyed the post Connie, and welcome to Life Images by Jill. I look forward to catching up with you on your blog very soon.

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  8. These are images that are heavenly...what an incredible place this Earth and especially there...I adored those reflections.

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  9. There are people all over the world reaching for their diaries to make a plan for a visit after reading this post! This is an incredible part of Australia, Thank you for showing if off so beautifully to all who visit. Good to see the camp chair comes with a nice cold glass of wine too!
    Have a happy week.
    Wren x

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    1. thank you so much. Of course - a camp chair and a glass of wine and a few crackers and cheese - what better way to end the day!

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  10. Such gorgeous scenery - and I love those wildflowers.

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  11. So beautiful! Thanks for sharing!

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  12. Hi Jill! What a gorgeous area. You have caught it well. It's nice to see that a lot of thought has gone into the signage and marking of the trails. That certainly helps visitors enjoy their stays.

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  13. As always, I reach the end of one of your posts and wish there was more! You make me feel as though I am right there with you and I so wish I had been to see that beautiful moon!!

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  14. Love the colours of the area. It looks like a spectacular place to visit. I need to put it on my list. I love the bird life.

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  15. You absolutely caught me with the moon photos... it looks so huge and so shiny in the second one!

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    1. This moon set was simply amazing with the sun coming up at the same time as the moon setting. Stunning.

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  16. I'm continually surprised by the variety in the landscape and the diversity of flora and fauna you have in Australia. Just beautiful, Jill.
    I love the Aussie Chick, too. A pretty cool bird, right?

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  17. Thank you wonderful friends and readers for stopping by and taking the time to comment. I have been away from my computer and my usual internet coverage this past week, so I have been unable to get back to you - but I truly appreciate each and every comment. I am looking forward to bringing you the next stage of our trip - the Kennedy Ranges. Stay tuned for that.
    Have a great week.

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  18. Love the reflection in the water hole - a very classy shot. But then so is the one of you with a glass of wine in your hand! One days we need to go camping and tramping together :) The walks looks stunning, such a gorgeous country and those wide open spaces - ahh food for the soul.

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