Welcome to Life Images by Jill

Welcome to Life Images by Jill.........Stepping into the light and bringing together the images and stories of our world.
Through my blog I am
seeking to preserve images and memories of the beautiful world in which we live and the people in it. And in many ways it is my journal of everyday life. If you click on the Index you can see my posts under various topic headings.
I am a Freelance Journalist and Photographer based in Bunbury, Western Australia. My published work specialises in Western Australian travel articles and stories about inspiring everyday people. My passion is photography, writing, travel, wildflower and food photography.
Most recently I have been enjoying exploring other art genres, including Eco-printing with Australian leaves onto cloth and paper.
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Monday, 29 January 2018

Australia Day & taking photos of fireworks

26 January in Australia is Australia Day.

I've blogged about it before here - Celebrating Australia Day and Waltzing Matilda 
and here - Australia Day on the beach 
and here - Australia Day - How Australian Are You? 


 There has been a lot in the press lately about Australia Day celebrating the day the British "invaded" Australia and took the land away from our indigenous population, and that the date should be changed. There were also protest marches in the street on Australia Day.

The date of Australia Day, 26 January, marks the anniversary of the arrival of the First Fleet of British ships at Port Jackson, New South Wales in 1788 and the raising of the Flag of Great Britain at Sydney Cove by Governor Arthur Phillip.


 
I don't use my blog to make political comments, but all I will say is - yes, terrible wrongs, including massacres, were made against the aboriginals, but we can't undo the past, and changing the date won't change these people's belief that Australia was invaded.
For me Australia Day is about coming together and celebrating our indigenous and immigrant backgrounds, our diverse multi-cultural community, what being Australian means to us and what makes Australia a great place to live.

Family History

For my own part, all sides of my family can trace their history back to early settlement in the mid 1850s, arriving by sailing ship as free settlers from different parts of Britain, with a convict, James Fairhead (who I briefly mentioned in my last post), thrown in for a bit of colour (he was pardoned soon after arriving). 

It is a family history that I am very proud of, and no-one will take that away from me.  These early settlers toiled with their bare hands, went without, and lived very simply in basic bush huts which they built themselves, much like this one below which we saw in the Wagin Historical Village a couple of years ago. My mother's early life was spent in a hut like this.



I found this quote on the net on the Australia Day website - which I think sums it up -  

 "Australia Day is for all Australians, no matter where our personal stories began. Reflect on being Australian, celebrate contemporary Australia and recognise our history."

So what do Australian's do on Australia Day?

  • There are Aussie breakfasts - in people's own homes, on the beach or in parks, and community run BBQ breakfasts.
  • Citizenship ceremonies for immigrants willing to pledge their allegiance to Australia.  
  • Australia Day awards to worthy Australians. 
  • Sporting events
  • Markets
  • Concerts, festivals and street parades
  •  Family gatherings
  • Days at the beach
  • Fireworks!
 One of the more unusual events I heard about was a race between the commuter ferries on Sydney Harbour in Sydney.

But however we celebrate, Australia Day is about family, community, and being proud of being Australian.

The beach is a very popular destination on Australia Day. 

  Australia Day fireworks

One thing I enjoy is the Australia Day fireworks. Yes, I know, it could be said it is a waste of money and the money could be better spent elsewhere. This is true, but our city's fireworks brings the community together. 

I don't take my tripod with me (so I can easily direct my camera), but it is still possible to take fireworks photos without one. I enjoy taking the photos hand held, and seeing what unusual effects are created. 
This year I tried the "bulb" setting on my camera for the first time. 

If you have never used "bulb" setting, and don't know what it is for, check your camera manual. 
Look for this dial on your camera and turn it to "B"


 Now when you press the shutter button the lens will remain open and the camera will keep taking a picture until your finger comes off the shutter button. Bulb mode is mostly used for long exposures at night. The main advantage is that it allows the photographer to achieve shutter speeds longer than the 30 seconds (displayed 30″ on the camera) that is allowed on most DSLRs

Check out this post from Improve Photography - What is the bub mode & ways to use it

Here are some of the pics I took on Friday night at the Australia Day fireworks.



And for some tips on shooting fireworks check out Digital Camera School.

Thank you so much for stopping by. Have you taken photos of fireworks? Did you get some unusual shots? 
I value your comments and look forward to hearing from you. I will try to visit your blogs in return. Have a wonderful week.

I am linking to the link-ups below. Please click on the links to see fabulous contributions from around the world -  virtual touring at its best!
Life in Reflection

Hello there! I love reading your comments. If you scroll down to the bottom you can comment too! I would love to hear from you.

You can also join the linky party at Wednesday Around the World at Communal Global right here! 






31 comments:

  1. I've never taken shots of fireworks but your wonderful images are making me wish I could. Our life here in rural Normandy doesn't lend itself so well to some of the tutorials you've shared (I'm still waiting to visit a town at night so I can get some street shots), I'm such a country bumpkin! I had high hopes last week when we should have been at a family celebration in London but sadly had to cancel when our dog sitter couldn't make it. C'est la vie.

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    1. I don't tend to take photos around the streets at night. You would certainly need to refine your camera settings.

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  2. Happy Australia Day! I love fireworks and your images are great. Thanks for the "bulb" info. Happy Monday!

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  3. I'm wishing you a Happy holiday too. I like what you've written and think it's good to understand the history AND to celebrate! Love the fireworks photos and I'll look at my camera and see if I have this setting! Sweet hugs, Diane

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    1. Life Images by Jill6 February 2018 at 21:39

      Have fun with "bulb" setting, or if you have a P&S look for "fireworks".

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  4. Every year I think I'll remember on time to wish my Australian blogger friends a Happy Day and every year I forget. thank you for sharing the celebration. Your fireworks pictures are spectacular.

    Seems like you have the right idea about the celebration ... I did read somewhere else that some cities are including celebration of the Indiginous culture and traditions along with everything else. Shouldn't that please everybody? You are all Australians. Anyway, the Day as you celebrated looks amazingly fun.

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    1. I agree - we are all Australians and should celebrate together.

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  5. As you have the Australia Day, we have here the 4th of July. Thank you with All Seasons to share it with us. Stunning shot of the flag!
    Even though I am still a Dutch citizen we celebrate it, even before we had two American son in laws. We are happy with the people, where we live. I totally get it being proud of your heritage - we should be proud of and respect the ones who have gone before us!
    Hubby is the one who took photography, so I borrow his fireworks pics:):)

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    1. I believe that people moving to another country should embrace that country's culture, whilst still remembering their heritage.

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  6. Never knew of the B setting and will have to tr it! Nice shots! So clear.

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  7. Great shots, sensible wrap up of Australia Day, and thank you for the tip about using the bulb setting! Wishing you a fabulous 2018 Jill. Congrats on your awards throughout 2017 too :-)

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    1. thanks Valarie, and have fun with the bulb setting.

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  8. Interesting challenges with Australia Day. The world over, people are questioning the rationale behind 'accepted' practices. I think, as long as everything is done respectfully, with a view to listening, we should be open to the perspectives of others. OK, enough of that. I tried taking fireworks pictures last year and was not successful, so thanks for the tips!

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    1. I agree with what you say Angie. Being respectful of others beliefs and practices is so important. I hope you have more success with fireworks next time round.

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  9. I share your thoughts about Australia Day. For me, as an immigrant, I'm so grateful to live in this amazing country, to spend one day a year expressing that gratitude and connecting with the Aussies who make my life so special.

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    1. I hope you had a fabulous Australia Day!

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  10. Fun stuff!
    Thanks for sharing at https://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2018/01/fun-with-textures-in-photoshop.html

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  11. Loved hearing about your Australia Day. Sounds like a fun experience. That is awesome that you trace your family way back to early times. I enjoyed visiting. Also, read your post on your book about My Brother Mark. You maybe have already considered, but lots have gone to self publishing using Amazon. Would probably sell there. :)

    Thanks for sharing
    Peabea@Peabea Scribbles

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    1. thank you for taking the time to read My Brother Mark and for the encouragement to publish.

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  12. When I saw your post drop into my inbox I knew I was going to be in for a treat! I loved being reminded of the olden days, and your photo of the hut made me think about my own Mum and Gran in England. They lived in tough times. Loved your firework pics and thank you for the photography tips too :)

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    1. I think it is so important for the younger generation to know where their families have come from and the hardships they endured.

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  13. Thank you for your sensible thoughts on land rights. It's definitely an issue here in Canada, too. Happy Australia Day! I've taken photos of fireworks but had my camera stationary. A longer exposure would give those interesting squiggly lines.

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    1. I love the squiggly lines - such fun - you don't know what you might get.

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  14. thanks for sharing Australia day. :) Love to take shots of fireworks too :)

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  15. Loved the post on Australia Day. (We have had similar protests while in Hawaii by those who'd prefer not to be a state any longer but return to the island Monarchy). I'll have to get back in the blogosphere saddle and be a part of Wednesday Around the World next week.

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    1. looking forward to seeing you next Wednesday!

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  16. Photos of the fireworks are stunning. This Tuesday we celebrate Waitangi Day kind of like Australia Day.
    dropping by from watw

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